Living At Sherwood Golf Club

Childhood memories

By Phyllis M Newton

 

Photo:View of Sherwood Golf House

View of Sherwood Golf House

Private Collection

 

When I was a little girl, along with my two brothers and two sisters we lived at Sherwood Golf Club. My dad John Harry Vamplew, known as George was the green keeper, he had previously been at Seacroft Golf Club, in Skegness.

 

 

 

 

The Greens

Photo:George Vamplew & son Bob mowing the green in front of the Golf House

George Vamplew & son Bob mowing the green in front of the Golf House

Private Collection

In those early days the greens at Sherwood Golf Club were cut with a grass mower, the type you pushed. The grass was cut in neat lines and dad always carried a little pair of scissors in his pocket to trim round the holes.
Photo:'Violet'

'Violet'

Private Collection

 

A horse called ‘Violet’ was used to drag a chain harrow over the fairways and to pull a trailer full of sand to put in the bunkers.

Photo:George Vamplew in the Bunker

George Vamplew in the Bunker

Private Collection

 

When there had been a heavy dew the greens were brushed with two six foot canes swishing them from side to side to sweep the dew off. Dad often used to scythe the long grass, he had a good knowledge of grasses and was in regular contact with seed merchants such as Ryder Seeds (Ryder Cup).

 

 

 

Neat and Tidy

The front of the golf house was always kept neat and tidy, we had to play at the back. I remember one year after bonfire night there were bits of fireworks all over the place, we children were all sent out to pick the bits up.

 

 

Holy Ground

Photo:'Jock' Ballentine circa 1926

'Jock' Ballentine circa 1926

Private Collection

The golf course used to be ‘holy ground’ with the caddy lads kept behind the shed. They would sometimes hide from a golfer who they knew didn’t pay very well.

I can recall professional golfers by the name of Rowland Tunbridge and Jock Ballentine who I believe he had been at Clipstone Camp.

 

 

 

 

 

Our Kitchen

My mother, Margaret Annie Vamplew was the stewardess and did the catering. It was hard work. She did the cooking on a big kitchen range with ovens at the side. A big black kettle hung over the fire. Eventually she had an oil stove with three burners, she made scones on these. Water had to be pumped from a well situated at the lowest part of the course, up to an open tank near the back kitchen. We all learnt how to do this.

Sunday Tea

On Sunday in the dining room it was boiled eggs, bread, butter and jam for the golfers. Two girls would help and wait on, and we did this when we were old enough. I remember my sister Evelyn and her friend Gladys Holmes helping in the dining room.

The Cellar

In the cellar there were cases of spirits and beer. These were delivered from R L Jones Wine Merchants in Mansfield. The driver was Freddy Newton who at one time had lived at Crown Farm. Mum would often send us children to fetch things from the cellar.

Wages

Mum also used to go and fetch the wages for the three men who worked on the course, Mr Whyles, Mr White and Mr Fox. She would walk up the Lane and catch the tram to Mansfield.

 

Playing and Gathering Fruit

Photo:Another view of the Golf House

Another view of the Golf House

Private Collection

As children living at the Golf House we had a lot of fun, we had so much ground to play on and the forest, the kids from Crown Farm would come down to play. They were happy times. If there was any bread and butter left from the golfers teas, mum would put jam on it for us and off we would go for a picnic. Mum always found time to play with us, and when it rained and no one was playing golf she would take us blackberrying. Dad would take us to gather strawberries, he knew where the wild ones grew.

1928 Onwards

We left the Golf House in 1928 when I was 15, but dad continued to work there, he was a green keeper for forty years. We all learnt to play golf, my brother Robert (Bob) became a professional golfer and lived in Leicestershire. Following in our parents footsteps my sister Kath and her husband also looked after Sherwood Golf Club for many years.

My article first appeared in The Forest Town Crier March 2004

 

This page was added on 24/10/2009.
Comments about this page

Sherwood Golf Club!! When did it become Sherwood Forest Golf Club? A few years ago the Golf Club celebrated its centenary and a book was published about 1995 I believe. The previous location of the Golf Club was where Ravensdale Estate is built, just below where ASDA is located going down Old Mill Lane towards Woodhouse before the Sandstone cutting there was a black Shale Road leading to a Plant Nursery. There was a cottage called Links,[Golf] cottage which puzzled a lot of people with its name until I read the area was the location of the original Golf course. Presumably the cottage was for the Greenkeeper and family. Interesting to see any photgraphs from that era. Tom Shead

By Tom Shead
On 04/03/2010

I called in the Museum today, Thursday and saw some Buxton pen and ink sketches in a frame on the RH side wall in the far Gallery. The subject matter is Goldies Mill and the Golf Links, I asked the staff for any info but we couldn't decide about the number, was it the date? or page number out of his sketch book!! The original Golf course was laid out I believe where the Ravensdale Estate is built but in the area of Barringer Road. Have spoke to a few ex members of the Eakring Road Club who have the Centenary book but can't recollect any details of the original site. Tom Shead.

By Tom Shead
On 05/03/2010

Used to caddy there 1938 A.G..Beck was the pro.in those days and lived in last house on Eakring Rd. before Oak Tree Lane, I played there around 1970s in NCB comps. Remember the Vamplew family.

By ARTHUR WRIGHT
On 23/04/2011

I have one of his Golf Clubs, A nice old Niblick with A. G. Beck stamped on it

By Steve Filsell
On 30/07/2017

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